The sixth Global Environment Outlook (GEO) for Cities report

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GEO for Cities aims to inform, engage and support dialogue among city decision makers and other actors involved in urban issues. The GEO-6 report, published in 2019, identified urbanization as one of five main drivers of environmental change and also looked at the impact on cities and city residents of related challenges such as climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution.

Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) for Côte d’Ivoire under the Adaptation Fund Project “Improved Resilience of Coastal Communities in Cote d’Ivoire and Ghana”.

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The Government of Côte d’Ivoire has appealed to UN-Habitat to support cities and coastal (and river/delta) communities in their adaptation to climate change efforts. This includes strengthening their resilience to coastal erosion and flooding, and their related impacts and risks.

Urban-LEDS I Newsletter #2

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The Urban--‐LEDS project responds to the fact that cities emit a large proportion of the world’s greenhouse gases and can take steps to reduce emissions. Citiesin Brazil, India, Indonesia and South Africa are outlining their Urban Low Emission Development Strategies (Urban--‐LEDS) and exploring implementation of a range of activities. In each country, two Model Cities are assisted in formulating and adopting their Urban--‐LEDS, and share their experiences with Satellite Cities, which observe, learn and share their own experiences.

Urban-LEDS Country factsheet: South Africa

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The South African governance system, defined by the Constitution of 1996, specifies the mandate of the three spheres of government: national, provincial and local. Recent laws and policies, including the Draft Climate Change Bill (2018), give a larger mandate to local governments when planning for climate action and responding to local challenges.

Urban-LEDS Country factsheet: Lao-PDR

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Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is increasingly shifting to a model of governance known as ‘sam-sang’ (3-build system), whereby responsibility is increasingly devolved to local administration levels (province, district and village). This poses an ideal opportunity to implement a well-integrated and vertically coordinated climate change response. In particular, structured, practical and long-term capacity building programmes are needed for all tiers of government, as is the integration of climate change into sectoral policies and plans.

Urban-LEDS Country factsheet: India

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India’s National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) was created in 2008. This broad national policy was the basis on which the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) was prepared. India’s federal structure distributes powers at national and state levels, and the implementation of the NAPCC is envisioned through the formulation of State Action Plans for Climate Change (SAPCC). Implementation of these will require clear Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) systems and access to finance.