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Leveraging Land: Land-based Finance for Local Governments. A Trainer’s Guide

Leveraging Land: Land-based Finance for Local Governments. A Trainer’s Guide

This guide is intended for trainers and facilitators in the GLTN and UN-Habitat Land-based Finance (LBF) Training course. LBF is a collective name given to a range of instruments by which local governments expand their revenue base and generate funds that will help them realize their service delivery, infrastructure development and maintenance goals. The broader contexts within which this tool is being developed are local governance and sustainable urbanization. The LBF tool is premised on the fact that urban land is a key factor of production and an important source of financing for urban development, including infrastructure, social housing and basic services. More info →
Implementation of Responsible Land Governance – Turkana County, Kenya

Implementation of Responsible Land Governance – Turkana County, Kenya

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) both recognize the importance of prioritizing and addressing issues related, but not limited, to customary land because of its huge potential to contribute to poverty reduction and positive potential impacts at a global level. In this regard, the two agencies are supporting the Ministry of Lands, Physical Planning and Urban Areas Management (MLPPUAM) of the Turkana County Government in Kenya to develop and rollout a land information management system (LIMS) to manage urban and customary land tenure within the county. More info →
Land Governance: A Review and Analysis of Key International Frameworks

Land Governance: A Review and Analysis of Key International Frameworks

Land and the way it is accessed, used and controlled is a key element of sustainable social and economic development, peace and stability, and the realization of human rights. This makes land governance a cornerstone for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and explains the attention that international instruments pay to it. Recently, the endorsement of various international frameworks has provided an impetus for the global land sector community as new opportunities emerged through these frameworks. More info →
A Multi-Country Capacity Assessment of National Statistical Offices Preparedness to Report on SDG Indicator 1.4.2

A Multi-Country Capacity Assessment of National Statistical Offices Preparedness to Report on SDG Indicator 1.4.2

United Nations Member States have committed to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) within a time frame of 15 years, endorsing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 70/1. More info →
Women and Land in the Muslim World

Women and Land in the Muslim World

Access to land is a key element that allows women and men to fully play their role in building peaceful, stable and prosperous societies and to enjoy the full range of human rights. Indeed, the social and economic development of communities and societies cannot take place in a sustainable manner without the full contribution of women. This report provides practical and evidence-based guidance on how to improve women’s access to land in the specific context of the Muslim world. More info →
Valuation of Unregistered Lands: A Policy Guide

Valuation of Unregistered Lands: A Policy Guide

Unregistered land rights may account for over 70 per cent of the land rights in a developing country (UNHabitat/ GLTN and IIRR, 2012). Often, there are either no or non-standard valuations in these areas. This holds back economic growth and can lead to hardship for the poor. GLTN, working with the international valuation industry, has initiated the development of guidance on this issue for policy makers, practitioners and other stakeholders. It is based on existing valuation methods. More info →
Planning Law Assessment Framework

Planning Law Assessment Framework

Genre: Featured
Ensuring that planning laws fulfill their functions as effectively as possible means that they are frequently under scrutiny as contexts and needs change. The Planning Law Assessment Framework, developed by the Urban Legislation Unit of UN-Habitat, is a quick self-assessment tool that aims to identify the strengths and weaknesses of an urban planning legal system. It looks at the laws, regulations and decrees that are applicable in a city, and enacted at different levels. More info →
Global State of National Urban Policy

Global State of National Urban Policy

Today, more than 50 per cent of the world’s population lives in cities. This figure will increase to a projected 66 per cent by the middle of this century and 85 per cent by 2100. Within 150 years, the urban population will have increased from less than one billion people in 1950 to nine billion by 2100 More info →
Space to Learn: Improving the Learning Environment in Mannar District

Space to Learn: Improving the Learning Environment in Mannar District

This publication highlights the key achievements of the project “Sustainable Resettlement through Community-Driven Improvement of the Learning Environment in Mannar District, Sri Lanka” implemented through a participatory people’s process from 2015 -2017. Through this project, UN-Habitat supported the construction and improvement of learning facilities in 25 schools in Mannar district with funding from the Government of Japan. It supported the construction of primary and secondary classroom buildings, water, sanitation and hygiene facilities and teachers’ quarters benefitting 10,000 returnees including 6,800 school children. More info →
Building Financial Resilient Neighborhoods: The Case of José Carlos Mariátegui, Lima, Peru

Building Financial Resilient Neighborhoods: The Case of José Carlos Mariátegui, Lima, Peru

The supply of affordable and adequate housing has been overwhelmed by the demand of the millions of rural poor who have migrated to cities in hope of finding better employment, health care, and better educational opportunities. According to UN estimates, the urban population of the developing world alone will increase from 2.7 billion in the year 2011 to 5.1 billion by 2050. To accommodate the more than 2 billion new arrivals, the urban footprint of cities in the developing world is expected to double by 2030—and triple by 2050. This rapid increase in both urban population and the physical size of cities implies a pressing need for housing and land. According to Reinhard Goethert of the MIT School of Architecture, “We have 20 years to build as much urban housing as was built in the past 6,000 years.”5 This is a challenge that will require an approach that is completely unprecedented in terms of scale and speed. More info →
Migration and Inclusive Cities: A Guide for Arab City Leaders

Migration and Inclusive Cities: A Guide for Arab City Leaders

Migration, especially forced migration, is one of the defining phenomena of the 21st century. Millions of people across the global have fled armed conflicts, persecutions, natural disasters, and/or economic hardships in recent years. Whether they crossed national borders or stayed within the geographic limits of the country in which they originally resided, their ultimate movement has mostly been towards cities. It is impossible to stop the influx of migrants into urban areas in the foreseeable future. People will continue to move towards cities in search for livelihood opportunities, security, and a decent life. Unfortunately, due to lack of planning and resources, many end up in overcrowded and underserved settlements or in remote urban areas that lack basic infrastructure, social services and connectivity to labour markets. Denied access to formal job opportunities and social protection systems and excluded from the urban advantages that they are seeking in cities, migrants, particularly the most vulnerable ones, are often stigmatized as a problem rather than recognized for their energy and potential contribution to urban life. More info →
Leading Change: Delivering the New Urban Agenda through Urban and Territorial Planning

Leading Change: Delivering the New Urban Agenda through Urban and Territorial Planning

The International Guidelines on Urban and Territorial Planning (IG-UTP) are a pivotal component of the framework for delivering a sustainable urban future. This book as a whole contains the strategic considerations and supporting line of reasoning that need to be considered when applying the IG-UTP. It is not a primer on planning and hence does not cover every issue encompassed by the IG-UTP. The starting point is that planning has to adjust to a new global context. Traditional forms of planning were formulated before concerns such as climate change, inclusion, metropolitanisation, spatial justice, gender, or resilience were considerations. Furthermore, an unprecedented extent of urban development is now unplanned and many cities are overwhelmed by dysfunctional and often slum-led urban growth. Planning needs to adjust to these new realities so that we do not continue on the current trajectory. Thus, there needs to be a culture change within the planning profession and among decision-makers and stakeholders. We need to build on the strengths of the planning tradition and to adapt to the complexity of accelerating global change by delivering at scale at a more rapid pace. Fiscal, taxation, governance, management and environmental regulation measures need to be supported by an integrative and nimble UTP that is strategic, participatory and based on human rights principles. More info →
Implementing the International Guidelines on Urban and Territorial Planning, 2015-2017

Implementing the International Guidelines on Urban and Territorial Planning, 2015-2017

The International Guidelines on Urban and Territorial Planning (IG-UTP) in 2015 are becoming an increasingly relevant instrument for the achievement of universal objectives since their release in 2015 as now acknowledged in the New Urban Agenda, and consequently, becoming a key contributor to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. The IG-UTP Implementation Report has been developed as a collection of experiences and findings both from UN-Habitat and IG-UTP countries and partners in using the IG-UTP at the global, national and local levels. It is the culmination of the first biennium of implementation of the Guidelines, the period 2015 – 2017, and it builds upon the results of the Global Survey on Urban and Territorial Planning formulated by UN-Habitat to track the adoption and use of the IG-UTP within countries. For the actors illustrated in this report, the Guidelines represent a collective voice for planning as they enable different roads and entries to the improvement of planning systems worldwide through their multilevel, multi-stakeholder and multi-sector model that leads all to one common goal: sustainable urban development. More info →
Egypt Housing Profile
Kenya Habitat Country Programme Document 2018-2021

Kenya Habitat Country Programme Document 2018-2021

The Kenya Habitat Country Programme Document (HCPD) 2018-2021 is in line with the UN-Habitat mandate under the Governing Council Resolution 21/2 of 2007 aimed at aligning UN-Habitat’s normative and operational activities at country level. Through HCDPs, UN-Habitat and respective countries jointly prioritise what is needed in human settlement development, including in the areas of housing, basic service delivery and improving the urban environment by ensuring that infrastructure is environmentally friendly More info →
Evaluability Assessment of the UN-Habitat Strategic Plan 2014-2019
Shanghai Manual 2017 Annual Report

Shanghai Manual 2017 Annual Report

According to Our Global Neighborhood released by the Commission on Global Governance in 1995, ‘Governance is the sum of many ways individuals and institutions, public and private, manage their common affairs. It is a continuing process through which conflicting or diverse interests may be accommodated and co-operative action taken. It includes formal institutions and regimes empowered to enforce compliance, as well as informal arrangements that people and institutions either have agreed to or perceive to be in their interest’. More info →
Steering the Metropolis: Metropolitan Governance for Sustainable Urban Development

Steering the Metropolis: Metropolitan Governance for Sustainable Urban Development

A distinctive feature of urbanization in the last 50 years is the expansion of urban populations and built development well beyond what was earlier conceived as the city limit, resulting in metropolitan areas. This is challenging the relevance of traditional municipal boundaries, and by extension, traditional governing structures and institutions. "Steering the Metropolis: Metropolitan Governance for Sustainable Urban Development,” encompasses the reflections of thought and practice leaders on the underlying premises for governing metropolitan space, sectoral adaptations of those premises, and dynamic applications in a wide variety of contexts. Those reflections are structured into three sections. Section 1 discusses the conceptual underpinnings of metropolitan governance, analyzing why political, technical, and administrative arrangements at this level of government are needed. Section 2 deepens the discussion by addressing specific sectoral themes of mobility, land use planning, environmental management, and economic production, as well as crosscutting topics of metropolitan governance finance, and monitoring and evaluation. Section 3 tests the concepts and their sectoral adaptations against the practice, with cases from Africa, America, Asia, and Europe. More info →
Reporte sobre el estado de las juventudes urbanas en Colombia. Caso: Santa Marta
Evaluation of the Seventh Session of the World Urban Forum 4/2016
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