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Alternative solutions to Forced Evictions and  slum demolitions

Alternative solutions to Forced Evictions and slum demolitions

Globally, poverty in urban areas is evident in the proliferation of slums and informal settlements. In 2001, 47% of the world’s population lived in urban areas, and it was expected that the number would reach over 56% within the next two decades,1 with a billion-people living in a slum.2 Moreover, at least 2 million people in the world are forcibly evicted every year, while millions are threatened with forced evictions. These issues continue to persist despite the fact that the right to adequate housing is guaranteed to all and a prerequisite to inclusive and sustainable urban centers. More info →
The State of China’s Cities 2016/2017

The State of China’s Cities 2016/2017

The State of China's Cities 2016/2017 (referred to as "the Report") expatiates the updates on urban development in China in recent several years. The compilation of the Report coincides with the pending adoption of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and the enacting of the New Urban Agenda. Therefore, the Report lays special stress on how China's cities integrate into the mainstream of world development, and by defining the theme of this year as Global Perspective and China Practice:  Planning for Future of Cities, will focus more on how China aligns itself with the international standards and adopt the practice based on its own specific conditions, among other things. More info →
A VÁROS- ÉS TERÜLETI TERVEZÉS NEMZETKÖZI IRÁNYELVEI
The State of African Cities 2018 – The geography of African investment

The State of African Cities 2018 – The geography of African investment

The aim of The State of African Cities 2018: The geography of African investment report is to contribute to development policies that can turn African cities into more attractive, competitive and resilient foreign direct investment (FDI) destinations. Attracting global FDI is highly competitive and crosses various geographic scales, therefore regional cooperation by cities and nations is critical. But FDI is not a panacea since it has both positive and negative effects and careful choices need to be made by cities in their pursuit of FDI, if it is to lead to inclusive economic growth. This report aims to provide guidance on these choices and to facilitate understanding of the complexity of global investment in Africa. More info →
The Human Rights in Cities Handbook Series: Volume I: The Human Rights-Based Approach to Housing and Slum Upgrading

The Human Rights in Cities Handbook Series: Volume I: The Human Rights-Based Approach to Housing and Slum Upgrading

Human rights are important as they set the minimum standards that are essential for people to live in freedom, equality and dignity. They give everyone the freedom of choice and expression and the rights to basic needs necessary for their full development and enjoyment of their rights, including education, water, sanitation, food, health, and housing. Human rights also protect against their abuse by people or entities that are more powerful. Furthermore, human rights inform the relationship that exists between individuals and their governments, distinguishing between every human being and governmental and non-governmental actors obligated to respect, protect, and fulfil these rights. More info →
Local Law Making in Cape Town: A Case Study of the Municipal Planning By-Law Process – Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 4

Local Law Making in Cape Town: A Case Study of the Municipal Planning By-Law Process – Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 4

This report examines municipal law making surrounding land use planning in the City of Cape Town. It investigates the extent to which the City of Cape Town has powers to make by-laws on land use planning and how much of that power is circumscribed by other state organs and levels. It also examines the institutional and practical context in which municipal law making takes place in order to assess the actual relevance of the city’s power to make law. More info →
Land Readjustment Experiences in Turkey: Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 3

Land Readjustment Experiences in Turkey: Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 3

This report analyzes the potential and challenges of land readjustment in Turkey, looking at the specific difficulties related to the implementation of projects and providing recommendations to improve implementation and outcomes. The methodology is based on a desktop study, in-depth interviews with selected experts and case studies on different uses of land readjustment. The desk study includes the findings of previous studies related to land readjustment; in particular, two surveys related to the use of land readjustment by Turk in 2003 and 2008. Turk’s questionnaire in 2003 surveyed 468 municipalities and 300 technical experts (surveying engineers and urban planners). The 2008 study surveyed 60 large municipalities. More info →
Supply of Urban Land For Development – Land Readjustment Experience in Gujarat, India: Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 2

Supply of Urban Land For Development – Land Readjustment Experience in Gujarat, India: Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 2

UN-Habitat has initiated a process of strengthening its urban legal knowledge and recently identified seven new focus areas, one of which is “urban legislation, land and governance”. The agency sees an important opportunity to influence member states’ and Habitat Agenda Partners’ initiatives on developing new and transforming old urban legislation. UN-Habitat has chosen to focus on a particular set of legal tools used to facilitate large-scale urban expansion, known as land readjustment / land pooling. More info →
Huambo Land Readjustment: Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 1

Huambo Land Readjustment: Urban Legal Case Studies Volume 1

This report is the result of an analysis of two land readjustment projects that were implemented in Huambo, central Angola, between 2006 and 2008. Land readjustment is the concept of assembling land with the general objective of facilitating the development or redevelopment of land. It has been used, for example, to redraw boundaries of rural land to make farms more efficient, to pool developed properties in brownfield redevelopment schemes, to assemble land for new developments in “greenfield” sites, and to achieve densification in already developed urban areas. More info →
Annual Progress Report 2017

Annual Progress Report 2017

Genre: Featured
This is the fourth Annual Progress Report on the implementation of the six-year strategic plan (2014-2019). The annual report is meant to communicate, in a transparent and accountable manner, the impact of UN-Habitat’s work as well as the use of resources by the Organization. The report, has been prepared in response to the Governing Council resolution 25/3 of April 2015, marks the end of the second of the three consecutive biennial work programmes and budgets that implement the six-year strategic plan. More info →
Global Experiences in Land Readjustment: Urban Legal Case Studies: Volume 7
Urban Law in Colombia – Urban Legal Case Study 5

Urban Law in Colombia – Urban Legal Case Study 5

The Colombian legal-urban framework is a robust and complex structure of tools that seek to meet land’s “social and ecological function”, defined by Colombia’s 1991 Constitution. It has become a renowned example in Latin America, as it introduces many different principles and tools that other countries in the region had not implemented or utilized. The strengthening of urban development and territorial planning as key elements in the overall development of Colombia has led to the creation of strong and renovated institutions, which seek to manage, coordinate, and control the new principles and tools for territorial development. More info →
International Guidelines on Urban and Territorial Planning (IG-UTP) Handbook

International Guidelines on Urban and Territorial Planning (IG-UTP) Handbook

In 2015, the Governing Council of UN-Habitat approved the International Guidelines on Urban and Territorial Planning as a set of universal principles for the improvement of policies, plans, designs and implementation processes that lead to more compact, socially inclusive, better integrated and connected cities and territories that foster sustainable urban development and are resilient to climate change. Still, while the Guidelines serve as a compass to guide decision-makers, a practical companion is required to operationalize their principles and recommendations. This handbook for the Guidelines is that companion, and part of a series of tools designed by UN-Habitat to improve planning practice.The approach of the Guidelines requires that planning is examined not only as a technical tool for urban and territorial change, but is also tested for the quality of the decision-making processes. Thus, the handbook provides an overview of the scope of topics covered by the Guidelines and puts special emphasis on planning processes, products and outcomes while making reference to additional tools, literature and resources for planners, civil society actors and policy-makers at the national and local levels. More info →
Paris Agreement

Paris Agreement

Global greenhouse gas emissions from human activity have increased significantly since the preindustrial era, driven by socio-economic progress and population growth. This has led to unprecedented atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) recorded over the last 800,000 years (IPCC 2014a). The increase in atmospheric GHG concentrations leads to global warming and climate change. Climate change is increasingly felt around the world, with negative impacts affecting more and more people worldwide. As a result global attention to climate change has increased significantly over the past decades, and more and more countries, businesses and individuals are discussing, demanding, and taking, climate action. More info →
Land Tenure Security in Selected Countries – Global Report

Land Tenure Security in Selected Countries – Global Report

Land tenure systems are the product of historical and cultural factors and they reflect the relationships between people, society and land (Payne, 2002). Land tenure comprises the customary and/or legal/statutory rights that individuals or groups have to land and related resources, and the resulting social relationships between the members of society (Kuhnen, 1982). Each country has developed specific land tenure concepts that are based on historical and current values and norms. The concepts determine the present tenure systems and they have often been shaped by an evolutionary process. In many cases, endogenous forces act as drivers that sharpen and change tenure systems, for example population growth, industrialization and urbanization, or accelerating natural resource exploitation. More info →
Scoping and Status Study on Land and Conflict (English 2016)

Scoping and Status Study on Land and Conflict (English 2016)

The global population is facing a range of large-scale challenges, which create increased competition and conflict over land at the transnational, national, subnational, local and family levels. This will increase over the next decades. By 2050 the world’s population will grow to around 9.6 billion people, with a population growth rate of 1 billion every 12 years. Already more than 50 per cent live in urban areas. All these people will need access to land and have to be fed in a sustainable way. The impact of this growth will be the greatest in the developing world, and particularly in Africa, where large-scale urbanization is expected. In 2010, 40 per cent of the population in developing countries was under 15 and young people (15-24 years) account for another 20 per cent. Young people are the least likely to have secure tenure (UN-Habitat/GLTN) and are a key vulnerable group. They are also the most likely to engage in conflict. More info →
Remaking the urban mosaic – Participatory and inclusive land readjustment

Remaking the urban mosaic – Participatory and inclusive land readjustment

The farmers of Fátima were sceptical t first: what did the provincial government want to do with their land? Fátima is a bairro (neighbourhood) on the southeastern edge of Huambo, the second-largest city in Angola, close to the airport. The provincial government wanted to make the land available for the city’s expansion. The area was still mostly farmland, but it was divided up into lots of irregular plots: too small and higgledy-piggledy to plan in a rational way. Each plot by itself was not worth much: most lacked road access and basic infrastructure. How could the land be allocated for development, while making sure the landholders got a fair deal? More info →
Fit-For-Purpose Land Administration : Guiding Principles for Country Implementation

Fit-For-Purpose Land Administration : Guiding Principles for Country Implementation

Many developed countries have strong land institutions and laws that protect the citizens’ relationship with land and provide land administration services to secure and often guarantee land rights. These services directly support land markets that underpin modern economies. Security of tenure is taken for granted. More info →
Cross-Cutting Issues Progress Report 2017

Cross-Cutting Issues Progress Report 2017

The UN-Habitat Strategic Plan 2014-2019 identifies four Cross-Cutting Issues to be mainstreamed: Climate Change, Gender Equality, Human Rights and Youth. The aim of mainstreaming these issues is to support country, regional and thematic offices, in order to ensure that all UN-Habitat work is targeting those furthest behind and promoting socially and environmentally sustainable cities. Mainstreaming does not require that each and every project directly aims to address and solve these issues, but rather that they are contributing to the larger long-term goals of UN-Habitat, the New Urban Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. More info →
Framework for evaluating Continuum of Land Rights scenarios

Framework for evaluating Continuum of Land Rights scenarios

A significant portion of land interests around the world are not recorded, leaving a large number of people vulnerable to land grabbing by the state and other powerful interests. The continuum of land rights is gaining traction globally as a metaphor to guide policies and strategies to improve equity in land tenure and land transactions, and to increase official recognition of different tenure types that provide various levels of security. The continuum offers an alternative approach to the dominant focus on titling of individually held private property as the ultimate form of tenure security, or the end goal of land tenure reforms. It promotes recognition and increase of security across the continuum, with opportunity for movement or transformation between different tenure forms. More info →
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